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Mélanie Laurent

Mélanie Laurent was born in 1983 in Paris, France to a ballet teacher, Annick, and a voice actor, Pierre. Young Mélanie was also joined by a younger brother, Mathieu. Her formative years growing up in the 9th arrondissement of Paris were described by her as idyllic: “I had a perfect childhood. Quite simply, I was loved.”

Even though Mélanie was born into an artistic environment, it wasn’t until much later in her life that she began acting — and only by a chance encounter. In 1998, while visiting the set of “Astérix et Obélix contre César” with a friend (whose father was a member of the crew), she caught the attention of Gerard Depardieu (“La Vie en rose”, “Paris, je t’aime”, “Last Holiday”). He was taken by her and offered her a role in his next film role “Un Pont entre deux rives”. Depardieu also passed on key three pieces of acting advice to her: don’t take acting classes, don’t learn your lines too far in advance, and never be afraid of being ridiculous.

Year 2000, at just 17 years old, Mélanie was cast as Clara in Rodolphe Marconi’s “Ceci est mon Corps”. Co-starring alongside Mélanie was Louis Garrel (“The Dreamers”) and international icon Jane Birkin. That very same year, Melanie obtained her baccalauréat (French secondary school diploma), option cinema.

Thanks to Michel Blanc’s 2002 comedy “Embrassez qui vous voudrez”, Mélanie began to gain more recognition as an actress. She went on to play several supporting roles in box office hits, such as Jacques Audiard’s father-son based relationship drama “De battre mon coeur s’est arrêté”.

2007 was Mélanie’s break-out year in the eyes of the French public. In Alfred Lot’s “La Chambre des morts”, Mélanie starred in her first thriller as Lucie Hennebelle. Despite the film’s shortcomings, Mélanie had made an impressive performance, and it earned her a nomination for Best Actress at the 2008 Lumière Awards.

Perhaps most importantly, 2008 saw the emergence of Mélanie as a directing talent: her short film “De moins en moins” was selected as part of the official competition at the Cannes Film Festival. While she didn’t walk away with the prestigious Golden Palm, she did go on to direct pornographic short film “À ses pieds” later that year for cable television station Canal+ as part of the series “X Femmes”, an exploration of female sexuality.

In September 2008, Mélanie received the life-changing news that Quentin Tarantino had selected her to be his female lead Shosanna Dreyfus in his upcoming WW2 epic “Inglourious Basterds.” In the whirlwind four months of shooting that followed, Mélanie learned how to operate an old-style projection booth at Quentin Tarantino’s home in Los Angeles, learned to speak moderately fluent English, and found inspiration in Quentin for her own directorial efforts.

After wrapping “Inglourious Basterds”, Mélanie finally had the chance to pursue yet another artistic ambition of hers, which was music. She recorded a cover of Barbara’s “Du bout des lèvres” for the album Madame Aime with 12 other actresses early in the year 2009, and went on in May to record her own full-length with artists AarON and Damien Rice.


Cover art

Inglourious Basterds

$11.95 | 153 minutes

(2009) - Star(s)

A group of hardened Nazi killers stalk their prey in Nazi-occupied France as a Jewish cinema owner plots to take down top-ranking SS officers during the official premiere of a high-profile German propaganda film. As far as Lt. Aldo Raine&hellip…

buy nowmore info
Cover art

Inglourious Basterds (Special Edition)

$11.95 | 153 minutes

(2009)

A group of hardened Nazi killers stalk their prey in Nazi-occupied France as a Jewish cinema owner plots to take down top-ranking SS officers during the official premiere of a high-profile German propaganda film. As far as Lt. Aldo Raine&hellip…

buy nowmore info